Feed aggregator

Clippers use ball movement to dial up long distance in win over Atlanta

LA Times Sports - 3 hours 19 min ago

Lou Williams made the Clippers’ first three-pointer of the game off a pass from center DeAndre Jordan. Austin Rivers made the next three-pointer later in the first quarter off a pass from Williams. Wesley Johnson added another three-pointer later in the quarter off a pass from Rivers.

That was...

Categories: US SPORTS

Trump To Troops On Thanksgiving: 'You're Fighting For Something Good'

NPR Headlines - 3 hours 45 min ago

The president also said multiple times that the U.S. armed forces were better off under his leadership than under the Obama administration.

(Image credit: Alex Brandon/AP)

Categories: News, US News

A look at how UCLA and Cal will match up on Friday

LA Times Sports - 3 hours 49 min ago

California (5-6, 2-6) at UCLA (5-6, 3-5)

Friday, 7:30 p.m., Rose Bowl, TV: FS1. Radio: 570.

Marquee matchup

UCLA quarterback Josh Rosen vs. the Cal secondary. Rosen will be playing in what’s expected to be his final home game before entering the NFL draft. He’d also like to have a good showing...

Categories: US SPORTS

What we learned from the Ducks' 4-2 loss to the Vegas Golden Knights

LA Times Sports - 4 hours 4 min ago

The Ducks played perhaps their worst game of the season Wednesday night and fell to the Vegas Golden Knights, 4-2, in the first-ever regular-season meeting between the squads. The loss halted the Ducks' season-best three-game winning streak and, with it, all the momentum the team built after an...

Categories: US SPORTS

AP PHOTOS: Brazil prison holds beauty pageant

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
Women serving time at a prison in Rio de Janeiro have swapped their uniforms for gowns to take part in a beauty pageant.
Categories: News, US News

Rome gives taxi drivers courses to learn manners and English

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
Rome has started classes for hundreds of its taxi drivers to learn good manners and English.
Categories: News, US News

Pope prays for ‘seeds of peace’ for South Sudan, Congo

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
Pope Francis has led a special prayer service in St. Peter’s Basilica for peace in South Sudan and Congo.
Categories: News, US News

Greece’s vows greater effort to protect refugees over winter

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
Greece has promised to step up efforts to protect migrants and refugees over the winter on the Greek islands, but defended a 2016 deal between Turkey and the European Union to stop the westward flow of migrants into Europe.
Categories: News, US News

Rwanda offers to shelter African migrants abused in Libya

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
Rwanda is offering to host some, perhaps thousands, of the African migrants whose reported abuse in Libya has led to international expressions of revulsion.
Categories: News, US News

Sound heard in sub search was an explosion, Argentina says

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
U.S. and specialist agencies said the “hydro-acoustic anomaly” was produced just hours after the navy lost contact with the submarine last week.
Categories: News, US News

Watch: Brazilian cop with his infant on his arm kills two robbers in gun battle

Washington Post Headlines - 4 hours 16 min ago
He was off duty, shopping with his wife, when the armed men announced a robbery.
Categories: News, US News

As Concussion Worries Rise, Girls’ Lacrosse Turns to Headgear

US Sports - 4 hours 38 min ago
Unlike the boys’ game, girls generally have eschewed headgear partly to keep play more temperate. But concussion fears have teams adopting the equipment.
Categories: US SPORTS

Human Brains Have Evolved Unique 'Feel-Good' Circuits

NPR Headlines - 5 hours 12 min ago

A comparison of brain tissue from monkeys, chimps and humans suggests that our brains produce the chemical messenger dopamine, which plays a major role in pleasure and rewards, far differently.

(Image credit: D. Roberts/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra)

Categories: News, US News

Who Is Zimbabwe's New Leader, Emmerson Mnangagwa?

NPR Headlines - 5 hours 13 min ago

After Robert Mugabe resigned, Emmerson Mnangagwa returned to his country Thursday and asked "all genuine patriotic Zimbabweans to come together."

(Image credit: Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi/AP)

Categories: News, US News

How to talk to your relatives about climate change: A guide for the holidays

Nation of Change - 6 hours 24 min ago

Most people who know me are too polite to question climate change when I’m around, but there are relatives and old family friends who hint at the great divide between their worldviews and mine. I think they sincerely believe that I would crush the economy forever if I had my way. On the other end of the spectrum are friends and family who are alarmed by climate and genuinely want to know what we and our elected officials can do about it. But no matter who’s in the mix, it’s hard to bring my work home for the holidays. Most of the time it feels easier to leave our existential crisis unmentioned.

Last year, the Washington Post reported on research underscoring the importance of talking about climate change. The main takeaway was that people avoid talking about climate with their peers because they worry their peers won’t share their concerns. As explained by the study’s co-author, that creates a “kind of spiral, where people are silent because they don’t know what other people think and people don’t know what other people think because nobody’s talking about it.”

Since the election, the public debate around climate change has only become more toxically politicized, which makes it even more appealing to remain silent – another boon for Exxon and the fossil fuels industry. At the very least, it can feel pointless to try to argue with anyone who isn’t fully convinced about climate change by now. But at the interpersonal level, I still believe that hearts and minds can change at a dinner table and that those individual changes matter collectively.

Consider the transformative shift in opinion – and law – on marriage equality in this country. That shift is inconceivable without the courage of people who came out to their friends and families. The climate fight is different in fundamental ways, but progress similarly depends on a transformative shift in opinion and law. Right now, only one in five Americans hear people they know talk about climate change at least once a month, which says to me that we aren’t talking to our friends and families enough.

It has grown easier to make the case that climate change matters after a year of unprecedented hurricanes and wildfires. For people who are unconvinced about the role of climate change in these events, it’s worth mentioning that scientists are now able to determine with a very high degree of certainty how much more likely these disasters become with rising temperatures. For instance, a recent study found that the total area burned in the western U.S. over the past 33 years was double the size it would have been without any anthropogenic warming. That additional area equaled the area of Massachusetts and Connecticut combined.

If you want to push back on any argument that there are always anomalies in the weather, here is an especially powerful graphic that shows the undeniable increase in temperatures over the last century, with escalating increases since the 1980s.

Maybe more important than the science or data, which has left many people unmoved, is the willingness to share your personal experience of climate change. For example, climate change knocked at my door in the middle of the night last month. I was home alone with my 5-year-old son. There was so much smoke, it got in through closed windows and woke us up. A fire was raging in the Napa Valley, and for the next five days, there was no view out our windows, just gray. All the kids at school were wearing masks. Everyone felt sick from the bad air, and everyone knew someone who had been evacuated. We were addicted to news of the fire, which were uncontainable for days because it was too hot and dry for the time of year. There was nothing to do but hope for a merciful change in the weather, which didn’t come until after 43 people had died and 8,400 structures had burned. When we talk about the way climate change is getting real, it’s hard to have a superficial, partisan debate.

And then there’s the hopeful news about clean energy. That’s your ace card. A few compelling facts to put in your pocket:

  • The cost to install solar has dropped by more than 70 percent since 2010 in the U.S.
  • In fact, solar is on track to become the world’s cheapest source of power on an unsubsidized basis.
  • With no fuel cost and lower operating and maintenance costs, solar and especially wind are outcompeting even the most efficient new gas plants in states like Texas.
  • Renewable energy is creating jobs 12 times faster than the rest of the economy in the U.S.
  • While solar accounted for only 1 percent of our power mix in 2016, it already employs more people than the entire coal industry.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, solar installer is the fastest-growing occupation in the U.S., with wind technician coming in at a close second.

Why is all of this such good news? Clean energy is a boon to the economy no matter what your views on climate are. Right now, China is positioning itself to dominate the new energy economy, while the U.S. is doubling down on the fossil economy of the past. But there is still time for the U.S. to lead, if we make clean energy a top-line, bipartisan issue in this country.

For those who feel too defeated by the scale of climate change to engage, it’s worth underscoring that we are witnessing an energy revolution that can secure the future if we force progress fast enough. Burning fossil fuels accounts for roughly three-quarters of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, along with much of the worst air and water pollution in this country. Transitioning from fossil fuels to clean energy is the most important thing we can do to limit climate change. Clean energy also happens to be a powerful engine for health, wealth and democracy given the outsize contribution of fossil fuel interests to our money-in-politics problem.

The Trump administration and the fossil fuels industry is actively working against clean energy progress, but we have the tools, the courts, and the people power to keep advancing clean power in states and cities. If you want to talk about how we keep making progress over the next three years, a few concrete examples are written up here and here and here. The way that people are showing up, around the country, to transform our energy system is a source of hope and cheer for me and my colleagues at Earthjustice. Help us spread the word!

The post How to talk to your relatives about climate change: A guide for the holidays appeared first on NationofChange.

Categories: News

Earth dinner

Nation of Change - 6 hours 30 min ago

Let’s talk Turkey!

No, not the orange butterball sitting in the Oval Office.

I’m talking about the real thing, the big bird, 46 million of which we Americans will devour on this Thanksgiving Day.

It was the Aztecs who first domesticated the gallopavo, but leave it to the Spanish explorers to “foul-up” the bird’s origins. They declared it to be related to the peacock – wrong! They also thought the peacock originated in Turkey – wrong! And, they thought Turkey was located in Africa – well, you can see the Spanish were pretty confused.

So is the origin of Thanksgiving itself. The popular assumption is that it was first celebrated by the Mayflower immigrants and the Massosoit natives at Plymouth, Massachusetts, 1621. Not so, say the proponents of the Jamestown colony down in Virginia – they claim the Thanksgiving feast was first had there in 1608.

Hmph! Hold your horses, pilgrims. Folks in El Paso, Texas, say it all began way out there in 1598, when Spanish settlers sat down with people of the Piro and Manso tribes, gave thanks, and then feasted on roasted duck, geese and fish.

“Ha!” says a Florida group, asserting the very, very first Thanksgiving happened in 1565 when the Spanish settlers of St. Augustine and friends from the Timucuan tribe chowed-down on “cocido” – a stew of salt pork, garbanzo beans and garlic – washing it all down with red wine.

Wherever it began, and whatever the purists claim is “official,” Thanksgiving today is as multicultural as America. So let’s enjoy! Kick back, giving thanks we’re in a country with such ethnic richness and dive into your turkey rellenos, moo-shu turkey, turkey falafel, barbecued turkey…

Whatever you are planning on having for dinner to mark this year’s day of thanks, how about having an earth dinner?

Not that you’d eat earth, but that you and others would gather around a table for a social occasion to celebrate the bounty of our good, green earth. This is not just another Thanksgiving event, but a festive opportunity to have friends and family cook, eat and drink together while reveling in the culture of food.

Most of us don’t realize that our dinner tells many stories, embodying our personal histories, family memories, music, art, and other connections… besides our tummies. To help reawaken those cultural links in a way that can be tasty, touching and fun, the folks at Organic Valley Family of Farms have come up with the novel idea of Earth Dinners.

The concept simply involves throwing some sort of dinner party at which the food is not merely consumed, but also is the focus of table talk, reminiscing, singing, laughing, game playing, and whatever else you can dream up. It can be a potluck dinner, a buffet, a five-course gourmet meal, a backyard barbeque… whatever suits you. The key is to know something about the food being served – where it comes from, the history of some of the ingredients, songs written about it and so on.

The goal is to get everyone connecting in some personal or cultural way to the dinner as it progresses. Ask guests to tell stories about their very first food memory, or to recall any family member who was a farmer or a jolly cook. Invite people of diverse backgrounds and all ages. Ask a farm family to join you, or a cheesemaker or others involved in producing food. Then – eat, talk, enjoy!

Rootstock is a cooperatively produced blog authored by organic farmers and part of the Organic Valley Family, they offer a sort of Earth Dinner starter kit, with tips on everything from menus to party favors, as well as providing reports on successful dinners that others have put together.

The post Earth dinner appeared first on NationofChange.

Categories: News

Native people and allies pledge to stop Keystone XL

Nation of Change - 6 hours 40 min ago

I’m in Lower Brule, South Dakota, where elected tribal officials, spiritual leaders, Native grassroots organizations, youth groups, and traditional women’s societies have gathered with non-Native farmers, ranchers and others affected by the Keystone XL pipeline. That project to carry tar sands from shale fields in Canada to the Gulf of Mexico threatens our water, our livelihoods and our sacred sites.

We were together Monday when we heard the news Nebraska’s Public Services Commission gave approval to an alternative route for the pipeline.

Yes, we were sad, and angry. But within minutes, we went from being sad to being strategic. That decision opens a new terrain to continue the fight to prevent the building of KXL, and it can be stopped if we build on the strong relationships between Native leadership and non-Native farmers and ranchers. We can leverage the power of organized prayer in a values-led campaign that puts Mother Earth above profit-hungry fossil fuel corporations.

What we learned in Standing Rock

Many of us are veterans of Standing Rock. We learned so much during those long, cold months at the Oceti Sakowin camp, in our struggle to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

We won at Standing Rock, even though the oil is now flowing. Because over 400 tribes came together to stand with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe for their sovereign, moral and inherent right to protect the Missouri River and Mother Earth.

Native peoples have a unique role to play in building a movement that defends the planet, and in creating a future where we all can live in healthy communities.

Joining our struggle

What began as a struggle to protect the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s water supply and sacred sites grew into an international movement to protect the water for the 17 million people who live, work and play along the shores of the Missouri. Along the way, we were joined by by thousands more from all around the world.

As we believe, we’re all related, and that all we do in life, and nature has an impact on every one of us.

So the mood at our gathering today is that in the present, we can act on the wisdom and knowledge of our ancestors, and protect future generations from destruction if we work strategically. We must lead with love for humanity, for community and for Mother Earth.

We must plan and organize, not just politically, but also with the prayers that will give us the strength and courage to do what we need to do to stop this pipeline. Tribal leadership and Native communities are the keys to winning this struggle.

TransCanada knows

The truth is that TransCanada, the pipeline’s builders, aren’t happy. Nebraska allowed their project to proceed, but they didn’t get what they wanted. A new route means TransCanada has to decide if the costs of proceeding are worth it.

TransCanada’s investors must face questions of the viability of building a pipeline that has been fought for years as oil prices have dropped. Quarterly earnings come out December 9, and their shareholders meet on December 15. According to the New York Times, they still haven’t decided whether they will proceed with building the pipeline.

The price of oil is still low. And the movement we started at Standing Rock succeeded in the divestment of $5 billion from the Dakota Access Pipeline. City governments, union pensions and individuals were convinced by the power of the Oceti Sakowin Camp that it was immoral to have their money fund that pipeline. We can do the same with Keystone XL, and TransCanada’s investors know it.

What we see

So what we see here in Lower Brule is that all up and down the new proposed route, there are possibilities to challenge the building of Keystone XL.

Sadly, we’re also gathered near where 210,000 gallons are leaking from the Keystone 1 pipeline. TransCanada has proven that they’re not prepared to deal with this kind of calamity, nor can they protect the precious aquifer and wells that are critical for ranching, irrigating crops and drinking water.

The movement to stop Keystone XL has momentum, because it is grounded in the Indigenous practices of living in harmony with nature. Ourstrategy and tactics are rooted in the inherent responsibility of indigenous communities to do whatever is necessary to protect the land, water and air from destruction.

Our power has grown

Response to this week’s KXL permit decision comes out of years of united resistance between Native and non-Native landowners. Our power has grown since Standing Rock. People now understand that if we build unity, if we build a movement with compassion for Mother Earth and concern for Humankind, we can win the hearts and minds of a broad cross section of people in this country.

And if we beat Keystone XL, we can disrupt the pro-fossil fuel campaign coming from the White House. We will signal an unmistakable challenge to all those running for office in states where American Indians are concentrated that the Native vote is the swing vote, which will be mobilized all the way from prayer camps to the voting booth.

There’s a very keen awareness that this fight is important not only for those who live along the pipeline, but also for how our country can become less dependent on fossil fuels, and we can move towards the protection of our planet.

A family reunion

So here in Lower Brule, we’re holding a family reunion: veterans of the first successful KXL fight, the Standing Rock family, with newcomers, Natives with non-Natives. Strategizing, sharing stories and renewing our shared commitment to protecting the sacred from desecration by fossil fuels has made us even stronger.

But the coming battles are going to be new, not like the ones in the past, and will demand all our strength. The traditional indigenous practice is that you must respond to adversity with courage, humility, compassion and love of community as we always have.

The NO KXL movement is being built from a spiritual starting point that’s rooted in the traditional Lakota, Dakota culture and origin stories, in the grassroots and in sovereign treaty rights that have been so often ignored.

Wherever you are

Together with our allies like 350.org, Greenpeace, and Rainforest Action Network, we “Promise to Protect the Sacred.” So if the need arises, if we have exhausted all local avenues, when we need assistance, people from all over the world will be called to come to Nebraska and South Dakota to physically stop the building of this pipeline.

Wherever you are, please take a moment to remember think about how you can be a part of this historic movement to stop Keystone XL.

Native peoples have a legal, moral, spiritual and inherent right to be caretakers of the planet. The sacred teachings of our cultures reflect the resilience that has brought us this far, by prioritizing kinship, reciprocity and community building. It’s about preserving relationships and living in balance, with all things – natural, human and animal.

The post Native people and allies pledge to stop Keystone XL appeared first on NationofChange.

Categories: News

Correction: Germany-North Korea-Protest story

Washington Post Headlines - 6 hours 45 min ago
In a story Nov. 18 about a protest in Berlin against tensions between the United States and North Korea, The Associated Press erroneously identified one of the organizations involved. The group is called International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War, not International Pediatricians for the Prevention of Nuclear War.
Categories: News, US News

Ukrainian separatist chief accuses another of plotting coup

Washington Post Headlines - 6 hours 45 min ago
A separatist leader in Ukraine’s east on Thursday accused a former official of trying to unseat him as a showdown between the two entered its third day.
Categories: News, US News

AP Explains: The search for Argentina’s missing submarine

Washington Post Headlines - 6 hours 45 min ago
The Argentine submarine ARA San Juan went missing in the South Atlantic last week with 44 crew members aboard. Here’s a look at the submarine and the round-the-clock international maritime search.
Categories: News, US News
Syndicate content